Shedua

Shedua Flooring SpeciesScientific Name:
Daniella thurifera

Other Names and Species:
Daniellia
Eyhedua
Fara
Faro
Gum Copal
Incenso
Nsou
Ogea
Oziya

Origin:
Africa

Appearance:
The sapwood of shedua is white to straw colored, while the heartwood is light golden brown to reddish-brown in color. The species has a shallowly interlocked grain, is lusterous, and is fairly coarse and somewhat gummy in texture.

Properties:
Shedua has little natural resistance to termites or decay, and as such should be treated as a preventative measure. The wood remains smooth under friction and is reported to have no odor. Shedua dries rapidly with little degrade resulting from the process.

Janka Hardness: 710
As a flooring option, shedua falls on the lower end of the janka hardness scale. It falls between longleaf and shortleaf southern yellow pine in hardness, is roughly fifty-five percent as hard as red oak, is just under forty-nine percent as hard as hard maple, a little over forty-two percent as hard as wenge, and is only slightly under one third as hard as santos mahogany's ranking of 2200.

Workability:
Shedua only slightly dulls cutting surfaces when sawing. Glue and nails hold good with shedua flooring. This species sands and polishes fairly well after filling but can marr easier than some species under heavy traffic.

Principal Uses:
Shedua's uses include flooring, joinery, paneling, vaneer, and furniture components.

 

Back to Top